Tag | .NET 3.5 Posts

UPDATE (12/17/2007): My blog has moved. This post is now located at: http://jason.whitehorn.ws/2... As many of you have, I also have experimented with the pre-releases of .NET 3.5 and Visual Studio codenamed Orcas. I, for better or worse, installed this pre-release software on my primary development machine which has Visual Studio 2005. Despite having .NET 3.5 installed on my machine, my primary development occurred in .NET 2.0 via ...
First, a choice of tools.. I am going to use Visual Studio 2008. I know, it is in Beta, Beta 1 in fact. But Beta 2 should be out soon, and it should release q4 of 2007, q1 of 2008. There might be a tighter date published, but I haven't looked today. It also has a better support for WCF and the .Net 3.5 stuff in general. So, that is where we are going to live. Contract definition As far as I can tell, WCF has four kinds of contracts. (btw, thanks Juval Lowy's book for the list that is coming) Service ...
After I posted about the problems I was encountering with the Silverlight installation, Microsoft's Aaron Stebner contacted me and offered his help. Aaron is a .NET setup specialist. After enabling verbose logging and his inspecting my setup log files, the answer was to uninstall .NET 2.0 and then reinstall 3.5. Unfortunately, my .NET 2.0 installation was apparently corrupted, because the framework didn't appear in the "Add/Remove program" dialog. Thankfully, removing corrupted .NET installations ...
You got to love this delicious alpha feeling, when you try to install something and it fails with an non-understandable error message... Yum!! In my case, installing Orcas fails. I managed to find out that the package responsible for the failure is the .NET 3.5 redistributable. While the error code is just a generic "error 1603", looking in the Windows Event Viewer shows that "Product: Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 (Pre-Release Version) -- You must first install Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0SP1 before ...
UPDATE (12/17/2007): My blog has moved. This post is now located at: http://jason.whitehorn.ws/2... A year ago I blogged about Tail Recursion in C# on .NET 2.0. With the public beta of .NET 3.5 now available, I decided to retry my little experiment. For the experiment I used Beta 1 of .NET 3.5 (version 3.5.20404), which you can get from here. Using the supplied compiler, I compiled the following C# code: public class TailTest{ public static void Main(){ TailTest ...
A few months ago, Phil Haack wrote about a phenomena being referred to as Search Driven Development (SDD). If you don't know what Search Driven Development is, there is a great article on LinuxWorld by Ken Krugler and John D. Mitchell. According to them article About 25% of a developer's time is spend [sic] searching for information. It's well spent, though -- finding reusable code can get a project done on time and with high quality results. I don't know about you, but (like Phil) I find that Google ...
If you've been programming in .NET for a while, you most likely have one or both of .NET Framework 1.0 and 1.1 installed. Visual Studio 2005 was released with .NET 2.0. .NET 3.0 was released along with Vista. .NET 3.5 is supposedly coming late this year with Orcas. If you're really lucky you may have one or two beta releases (hey, don't those get uninstalled?) of some of those as well. And don't forget those wonderful service packs. How do you tell what versions of the runtime are installed to verify ...
It seems the LINQ guys have done a great job of optimization inside of the LINQ namespace (System.Linq). http://blogs.msdn.com/jomo_... If you take a look at this post, then subsequent comments and a response from the author, you'll see that the System.Query.Func dynamic delegate done in LINQ gave the same performace as a C++ version in the previous comment. Not that scientific, but curious. However, note improved performance of 900% comparing the ...
Day three of the MVP summit was held at the Microsoft Campus. Things started badly with a long and slow bus ride through heavy traffic leaving me with no time for breakfast when I finally arrived at the conference centre. I boarded the shuttle for building 43 to find most of my fellow BizTalk MVPs (the ones who have been staying in downtown Seattle since the weekend) equally late, and we arrived en masse about 15 minutes into the first session. Jesus Rodriguez was on his feet presenting the forthcoming ...
Almost five months ago, I wrote that "Microsoft screwed up big for customer confusion" with the whole .NET 3.0 naming thing. I got a few defensive comments about how the whole effort was great. Well, let's see. Today I read a post from a member of the Microsoft Architecture Editorial Board (whatever that exactly is). You know it is not going well when the post starts out with, "There has been considerable confusion about the differences between various versions of the .NET framework." My point exactly. ...
When I went to TechEd, I though I would do a bit of blogging every day, but I had forgotten just how busy you can get here. There's just so much to see. While you do get the DVD's containing all the sessions (except Chalk-Talk ones), it takes at least 8 weeks and nothing beats being there. Have got a copy of Visual Studio for Database professionals, which will be installed as soon as possible. While I'm not sure about using in production environment yet (if nothing else, it's not the finished version), ...