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Migrating SharePoint Content to Oracle UCM #2
So we landed on a solution. It's not ideal by any stretch, but it does accomplish the purposes we set out to meet, and it does give us a (small) step in the right direction in terms of moving the client to using Oracle UCM as the sole company-wide content repository. To recap, here's the skinny on what we're facing: There is a mandate in the company to move all "content" to Oracle UCM (a content unification measure) There is a significant amount of content in SharePoint (in the form of lists) that ......

Posted On Monday, October 19, 2009 12:39 PM

wsdl.exe - Unable to import binding from namespace
When trying to generate an ASP.NET proxy class from a physical wsdl on your local file system, you're probably doing something like this: wsdl.exe MySevice.wsdl /o:Proxy.cs /l:CS You'd expect a file named Proxy.cs to get created in C# for you. You'd be right, except if you're attempting to generate proxy for a service that uses complex types. If that is the case, you'll get an error that looks a lot like this: Error: Unable to import binding 'MyBinding' from namespace 'http://www.example.org/MyN... ......

Posted On Friday, October 16, 2009 5:53 AM

Migrating SharePoint Content to Oracle UCM
I’ve got an interesting challenge a client has asked me help with. We are attempting to move items from multiple custom SharePoint lists to Oracle UCM and continue to manage/review/approve the data through the SharePoint interface. Moving this list content to OUCM is part of a bigger strategy to centralize all of the “business truth” (content) to OUCM, while keeping SharePoint for collaboration. There are a lot of things to consider, and lots of risks to document. I'm just now getting to documenting ......

Posted On Tuesday, October 6, 2009 3:21 PM

Design Patterns That Get Implemented in Real Life
I think that the Gang of Four should consider my design pattern recommendations for inclusion in their codified list. And while I have seen ALL of these patterns shipped to production in real life, it doesn't mean that these are by any means the only ones that scream for inclusion. Anyone got any others? The Duct Tape Pattern Its versatility is unmatched – any two bits of code from any two systems can co-operate with the use of this simple pattern. Need a piece of data from an XML document to display ......

Posted On Monday, October 5, 2009 1:40 PM

Developers and Designers – A House Divided
As a web developer, I find myself having the same conversation over and over with HTML designers when it comes to agreeing on how to style common markup elements. The development cycle I experience usually ends up looking like this: 1. Requirements are agreed upon, and handed to the project team. 2. The PM tells the HTML designers make wire frames, screen comps, and they get approved. 3. Everyone codes frantically – HTML designers are making markup while coders are making functionality. 4. Coders ......

Posted On Sunday, July 19, 2009 4:20 PM

Service Architecture Using Spring.NET
If you’ve ever written a standard .NET ASMX web service before, you know the drill. You make your service, build out your web methods, publish your service, make your consuming web project, point your project to your service via a web reference, and voila! You get strongly-typed proxy classes auto-generated for your web service consumption pleasure… But this comes at a great cost. WSDL is slow, clunky, and bloated. All that proxy code that is generated results in serializing, packaging, unpacking, ......

Posted On Sunday, July 5, 2009 3:14 PM

Lessons Learned From Making SharePoint Recommendations
I was recently asked what lessons I've learned when recommending SharePoint for for meeting a business need. While books are written on this topic, I've distilled the list down to what I think are the core of the decision-making process. Know what your stakeholders require in objective, actionable terms This is known as extracting core business drivers. Note that I didn't say requirements. Requirements are what you hand to your developers - core business drivers are what you use to make your recommendation. ......

Posted On Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:24 PM

When not to use exception handling, or, "Don't try too hard"
Okay, people. I officially deem it OK to remove someone's geek cred if they put a try block around the entire of a method body. Furthermore, you get to remove even more geek cred if they just re-throw the error that was caused in the try block. Here's an example of what I'm talking about: private void foo() { try { // do the foo. // do more foo. // do the rest of the foo. } catch (Exception ex) { throw ex; } } Contrary to popular perception, try/catch blocks are not for preventing errors - they are ......

Posted On Friday, February 27, 2009 2:17 PM

97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know
A co-worker shared this gem with me, and every bit of it is true. This is a must-read for aspiring architects. http://97-things.near-time.... One thing that I really appreciate about the articles on this site is that they draw a clear distinction between an architect and a senior developer who calls himself an architect. While many people feel that a certain number of years of programming experience entitle you to architect status, programmers ......

Posted On Thursday, February 26, 2009 6:05 PM

Systems Design and Poker Odds
Deciding whether to implement a new, unproven widget to save in development costs is a lot like deciding whether to call a player who goes all-in on the first hand of a poker game. You may land your cards, but is it really worth it? The way to determine whether or not to take the risk with an unproven widget is a lot like how a professional would assess the scenario I just described. An accomplished poker player knows what each hand is worth, not only in terms of the potential winnings, but in terms ......

Posted On Saturday, February 7, 2009 9:15 PM

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